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Please note that all posts are copyright. Do not reprint in whole or in part without permission of the author. You may refer to one of my posts in your own writing; simply include the link(s) so readers can be taken directly to my work. Thank you, and enjoy! ~Susan

Friday, 24 June 2016

Flashback Friday

Proud great-grandpa to my daughter
Today we go back to October 18, 2010 for this post from my old blog. I thought it was appropriate in Father's Day month:
 
I've mentioned before that I try to keep my grandfather's memory alive by frequently incorporating his sayings into my speech, but this weekend I also found myself acting in ways that he would act. Yesterday our family took a Sunday drive to see some fall colour. We wound up at a conservation area where lots of other people had obviously had the same idea. And that's where it all started.
 

A group of people carrying coolers and picnic supplies walked down the path toward us. Further along, a man who was obviously one of their party, hurried along carrying a crock pot. "What's for lunch?" I sang out. After he recovered from my unexpected and startling question - how many strangers even speak to one another these days? - he laughed and went on.
 

We hadn't come entirely prepared for our drive - had stopped for lunch along the way, but had no liquid to take on our hike and were soon feeling parched. I asked a returning walker if she had a water bottle to spare as we headed out. She didn't, but offered us an apple juice box, which I accepted with thanks. I'd given to a stranger on the street the day before, so I didn't feel too badly about seeking assistance in staving off our own dehydration.
 

Later, as we huffed and puffed toward a scenic lookout, I saw a woman approach. She looked pained and strained from the effort of her exertion, but was holding a coffee cup. "Oh, good," I quipped as she drew near, "There's a Timmies at the end." Her expression changed for the better immediately as she laughed in response.
 

This morning I had to drop my car off at the shop. I was either going to have to ask the mechanic for a drive home, which he's given me before, or hoof it back myself. It was a nippy morning, so I didn't really look forward to walking, especially through the industrial area. A woman and her husband were dropping their car off at the same time, so I asked if they'd mind my hitching a ride partway back with them. I could easily walk the rest of the way from the main intersection. No problem, they said. I never do that, but they looked like nice people, so I took the chance. We had an enjoyable conversation en route and they ended up driving me all the way home.
 

That's the kind of thing my grandfather would do all the time - engage people, speak to random strangers, make them laugh, ask for and offer help. And in doing it myself, I can see the benefits - not just for others, but for oneself. It's fun, it often doesn't cost any money, and everyone feels better in the end. In lieu of having my grandfather here, I'm glad to see that he hasn't entirely "left the building." In fact, the people you love are never gone as long as you remember them and live their best qualities. So I am happy to be, in some small way, my own grandpa. 

13 comments:

  1. I think we all become someone from our families at some point. We remember them, we honor them, we emulate them, and then one day we take their place... but they are never forgotten.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Toinette. Our family members are indeed never forgotten.

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  2. That's lovely. Just plain lovely.

    Love,
    Janie

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  3. That's a great lesson. I had a situation just last night where my night became better by engaging those around me. I need to learn to do that much much more.

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    1. I think we all do - it would make the world a better place, a more peaceful place, a more understanding place.

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  4. It's a lovely tribute to your grandfather that his traits live on in you. Asking for help is something I'm reluctant to do, for some reason but I don't hesitate to offer help.

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    1. I think it's hard for a lot of people to ask for help - maybe it's pride, maybe it's not wanting to impose on others - but help is not a four-letter-word, no matter how it appears on paper. You know what a gift it is to offer help, so know that when you accept it, you are allowing other people to enjoy that same gift. XO

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  5. That's beautiful! I still manage to believe that most folks are just folks trying their best to live their lives as decently as they know how.
    Barbara from Life & Faith in Caneyhead

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    1. I think so, too, Barbara, although you wouldn't if you read too much of today's news. Blech.

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  6. "the people you love are never gone as long as you remember them and live their best qualities." <3
    I just signed up for 'FlashBack' and stopping by for a visit.
    https://meinthemiddlewrites.com/2016/06/24/me-in-the-middle-of-looking-back-flashback/

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  7. Aw I love it!!! Wow...I can totally hear and see grandpa in you as you described those scenarios. Totally grandpa things to do and say!! Love it!!

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