Copyright

Please note that all posts are copyright. Do not reprint in whole or in part without permission of the author. You may refer to one of my posts in your own writing; simply include the link(s) so readers can be taken directly to my work. Thank you, and enjoy! ~Susan

Tuesday, 4 April 2017

Communicate

As with adjusting and blessing, hopefully you've been communicating with your child(ren) all along! The nature and depth of communication changes over the years as infants learn verbal skills and become better able to express their wants, needs, likes and, when they're older, their opinions, views and values. Communicating with a toddler is different from communicating with an older child who has the ability to reason.

Things sometimes go askew as children grow into adolescents and teens and are more concerned with how their peers think and perceive them. They're often motivated by a desire to separate from parents, to be seen as different from them, and are attempting to figure out who they are exactly. They can become more secretive, apt to speak in grunts, challenging parents on everything from morals to house rules, etc. Communicating becomes more complex and you can feel like you're walking on eggshells as teen hormones rage and moods swing.

Suddenly though, they're young adults, living at or away from home. Continuing communication is important if you hope to have a relationship going forward. Barbara in Caneyhead wrote about advice-giving a couple of days ago; her points are worth reading. If your child lives in another town or city, there's always the phone, texting, Skype, FaceTime, e-mail, Facebook or other social media, but why not resort to an old-fashioned letter, card or care package to let him know how much you care? Remember also that God gave you two ears and one mouth so you can listen twice as much as you speak. 

The last thing you want is for your voice to sound like this to your child's ears:
___________
I should probably note that this is part of the A to Z Blogging Challenge that takes place each April. Join in anytime you like! 

8 comments:

  1. This was timely. I'm about to send a letter to my oldest off at college. I just texted her to see if she'd like something in a care package (guess what she'll say? haha.)

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    1. I'm guessing that'll be a big YES, Eli! Thanks for stopping in :)

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  2. Right on and thanks for the mention! I found with both my boy and my girl that our time together in the kitchen and our time when I went to say goodnight were the times we talked the most, laughed the most and sometimes cried together.

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    1. Yes, kitchen-time and bedtime are great times for chatting with your young people. I find that in-the-car times are also great, or when I take one of them out for a one-on-one coffee/lunch date!

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  3. Communication in mine mostly happens around the dinner table. One meal where the whole family eats together.

    Nilanjana.
    Madly-in-Verse

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    1. That's great if you can keep it going. Once they have jobs or extra-curriculars, it can become more tricky to get them round the table every night. But kudos if you can pull it off!

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  4. Since communication is a two-way street sometimes you might be communicating and they don't. It's sad to lose contact with adult children!!

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    1. True, Paula! Also, you may be saying one thing and they are hearing another. In that case, if you still have any kind of interaction with them, reflection and paraphrase are good tools for making sure each person is understanding the same thing.

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I appreciate your comments and try to respond to each one!